Review: Fade

For Janie and Cabel, real life is getting tougher than the dreams. They’re just trying to carve out a little (secret) time together, but no such luck.

Disturbing things are happening at Fieldridge High, yet nobody’s talking. When Janie taps into a classmate’s violent nightmares, the case finally breaks open — but nothing goes as planned. Not even close. Janie’s in way over her head, and Cabe’s shocking behavior has grave consequences for them both.

Worse yet, Janie learns the truth about herself and her ability — and it’s bleak. Seriously, brutally bleak. Not only is her fate as a dream catcher sealed, but what’s to come is way darker than she’d feared….

The power went out for the afternoon one day, and I thought it would be the perfect time for me to read this book. I gobbled it up.

Writing: 3 wings

Similar in style to the last book, the prose is quick, and slightly disjointed. It’s made for quick readers, like me. It didn’t quite have the same snappiness as the last book, though. My favourite bit of writing in the book is near the end, when she attends a science party. If you’ve read this, or are going to read it, you’ll know the part I mean when you get there. It’s pretty hilarious.

Plot: 3.5 wings

One thing I do appreciate about WAKE and FADE is that they could potentially be stand-alones. While Cabe and Janie’s relationship develops in Fade, the case that they’re working on is front and center.

The description also makes it sound more epic than it actually is. At the risk of spoiling things, here is what NOT to pay attention to in the back cover description:

For Janie and Cabel, real life is getting tougher than the dreams. TRUE. But mostly because Janie’s dream issues get in the way.

They’re just trying to carve out a little (secret) time together, but no such luck. MOSTLY FALSE. They live down the road from each other, and Janie’s mother doesn’t care…so Janie can sleep over at Cabe’s whenever she wants. They apparently have to keep their relationship under wraps because of the events that transpired in the last book, so they can’t be around each other at school, but otherwise, they can spend all the other time in the day together.

Disturbing things are happening at Fieldridge High, yet nobody’s talking. TRUE. This is where it is interesting.

When Janie taps into a classmate’s violent nightmares, the case finally breaks open. FALSE. At least, in my opinion. Basically, the police start investigating an anonymous call made a few months back on a student’s crime report line. From what they can decipher, they think some of the teachers are having sexual relationships with their students. The case breaks open when Janie deliberately starts leading on one of the suspected teachers. Her nightmares of her fellow students only confirm her suspicions.

— but nothing goes as planned. Not even close. FALSE. If anything, the plot is pretty predictable. In a “and then this happened and then this happened” kind of way. This doesn’t mean it’s not entertaining, I was just hoping for more of a twist during the climax.

Janie’s in way over her head, and Cabe’s shocking behavior has grave consequences for them both. FALSE? Did I miss something here? Cabe is upset that Janie has to be bait for a potential sexual predator, and has a bit of a tantrum in there too, but I wouldn’t say his behaviour is shocking or has any particular special consequences. Bad, bad description.

Worse yet, Janie learns the truth about herself and her ability — and it’s bleak. Seriously, brutally bleak. Not only is her fate as a dream catcher sealed, but what’s to come is way darker than she’d feared…. TRUE. But she really only learns the truth at the end of the book.

Characters: 3 wings

Cabe and Janie have a lot of issues. I’m not really sure if what they have is a healthy relationship, but I was routing for them anyway. I thought it was relateable when in one scene they discuss their true feelings via email, even though they were in the same room. There’s something very real about that–being able to articulate your words better in writing than verbally.

Something I was disappointed in was that Janie’s relationship with her mother has developed any. There is a scene at the beginning of the book that addresses this relationship, and I thought it might be further explored, but it wasn’t. Maybe in the next book?

Overall: 3.5 wings

Story was a bit predictable. But it is a fun, quick read. If you don’t go into in-depth analysis, you’ll see it for what it is: a few hours of harmless fun.